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We’re seeing more and more people itching to get back out on the trails as spring approaches. This can mean that we will start to see a lot of people coming in with hip pain or hip injuries…

If you’ve taken the winter off from running – be careful when jumping right back in. We recommend you prepare for running season again with some basic strength training exercises to keep yourself injury free!

In the video below, Jaime takes us through 3 exercises that we use to treat hip injuries. These exercises cover mobility, strength, and endurance.

First, you need good flexibility or range of motion. Exercise 1 above is called “the couch stretch.” Make sure your hips are square, your pelvis is tucked, and your glutes are engaged. Do this exercise morning and night.

Second, you need strength and control through that range of motion. The second move focuses on hip extensor strength and power. It also engages the core, and uses rotational control in the hip. Do these 3x a week while watching TV!

Third, you need endurance. This last exercise is a single-leg dead life variation. It focuses on hip control and endurance.  It integrates the whole limb – some people will feel it even more in the feet and ankles than in the hip! You can do these 3x a week – hold for 20 seconds and repeat 3-6 times on each side. If you’d like to wake up the hip a little before a run, you can also use this one as a warm up!

Each of these exercises starts with basic movement, but has variations that you can build to as you gain strength. Watch Jaime’s video above for a demonstration of each variation, and tips on how to get the most out of these exercises.

In-Season Training

Boys and Girls high school basketball seasons have kicked off and teams are into their conference schedules. Questions often arise concerning how often and how intense in-season training should be for teams. This is a topic that is worth hours of discussion.

Here are a few key things to consider:

  1. BasketballHopefully the players trained hard in the off season to build up strength, speed, and reactiveness. This will better prepare them for the season. Athletes need to be stressed in the off-season so they can adapt to handle the new workload once the season starts. It’s almost like building up a strength ‘reserve’. Players that stress themselves to the point of adapting in the off-season will likely have a larger reserve to draw from as the season begins. However, the qualities built during off-season training need to be trained in-season as well. In order to maintain qualities in-season, players need to train their bigger strength lifts every ten days. That means finding a time within the game schedule to program intense strength sessions. The players will need to lift > 90% of their maximum lifts.
  2. Recovery and response to injury drives everything. For the players getting lots of game time, overall volume needs to be lower. For players not getting as much playing time, coaches need to be careful not to let them become deconditioned. The individualization of workouts within the team will really spread out as the season progresses. There will be players who can continue to progress strengthening during the season, and others that need to be dialed down.
  3. Sleep, diet, academic stress, and mood should all be monitored for each player during the season. The best strength training plan in the world will fall apart if these four areas are draining a player’s reserve.
  4. Track RSI (4 hop test), maximum vertical jump, and even how players are handing some of their bigger lifts (squat, dead-lift). This will give a coach a decent measurement of where the team stands in terms of neuromuscular readiness. If these numbers start diving, workload needs to be adjusted.

Overall, teams that enter the season having been properly stressed to handle demands will be the strongest. Those that are given managed stress during the season to help maintain important athletic qualities are the ones who are most fresh in late February and March. They’ll likely be less injured and closer to their peak physical ability as tourney time begins.