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Dave Playing Pickleball

I know this isn’t a basketball image, but it’s a picture of me as a practicing “aging athlete” so I thought it’d do!

As an aging athlete, I know what it is like to have aches and pains. I exercise regularly so I’m used to some daily discomfort. But this time was different. Here’s what happens when the PT gets injured.

I was playing basketball with some friends and our kids recently while we were out of town. I saw a 7-foot tall hoop, and knew I had to try to dunk the ball. I took off on 2 feet, touched the rim, and then felt the worst thing I have ever felt in my life… my quad rip. After I landed, I knew exactly what I had done. Immediately, I felt for my quad tendon, because if it was torn I’d have to have surgery.

This scenario is a common thing that happens to us as we age. People get injured all the time. What I want to talk about is how I managed this. After an injury, getting into Physical Therapy RIGHT AWAY is one of the most important things you can do. I was out of town when this happened, but needed to be treated right away. Since this was a musculoskeletal injury, it was right up my alley to treat. I didn’t think there was any need to go a doctor. That being said, you may often feel the need to go to a doctor for an overexertion injury like this. That’s ok too! This hurt more than anything I’d ever done before. This time, however, I decided that I could manage it myself.

First, I used ice (right away) for 20 min on, 20 min off. I did this three different times that first night. Icing with my leg bent could keep it from scarring too much. The next thing I needed was some compression. I went to the pharmacy to find an ace bandage and crutches. They did not have an ace bandage so instead I bought some Coban Wrap. Compression can help keep the bleeding to a minimum. I used a sock and wrapped my leg with Coban Wrap.

Two days later, I returned home and started to work on it. I did a lot of soft tissue work, kept using ice, taped it, used pulsed ultrasound, and I even dry needled myself (please don’t try that at home)!

I’m about two weeks out and doing better. I’m not there yet. I can walk and bend my knee but still can’t go up or down steps very well. However, the daily treatment has helped immensely. I know that this injury may take 8 weeks to fully heal, but if not for early intervention I would be in trouble.

So, what is the morale of this story? Get in to see a Physical Therapist RIGHT AWAY after an injury. We have been through this, and we are here to help!

David NissenbaumStay well and happy healing,
Dave

In-Season Training

Boys and Girls high school basketball seasons have kicked off and teams are into their conference schedules. Questions often arise concerning how often and how intense in-season training should be for teams. This is a topic that is worth hours of discussion.

Here are a few key things to consider:

  1. BasketballHopefully the players trained hard in the off season to build up strength, speed, and reactiveness. This will better prepare them for the season. Athletes need to be stressed in the off-season so they can adapt to handle the new workload once the season starts. It’s almost like building up a strength ‘reserve’. Players that stress themselves to the point of adapting in the off-season will likely have a larger reserve to draw from as the season begins. However, the qualities built during off-season training need to be trained in-season as well. In order to maintain qualities in-season, players need to train their bigger strength lifts every ten days. That means finding a time within the game schedule to program intense strength sessions. The players will need to lift > 90% of their maximum lifts.
  2. Recovery and response to injury drives everything. For the players getting lots of game time, overall volume needs to be lower. For players not getting as much playing time, coaches need to be careful not to let them become deconditioned. The individualization of workouts within the team will really spread out as the season progresses. There will be players who can continue to progress strengthening during the season, and others that need to be dialed down.
  3. Sleep, diet, academic stress, and mood should all be monitored for each player during the season. The best strength training plan in the world will fall apart if these four areas are draining a player’s reserve.
  4. Track RSI (4 hop test), maximum vertical jump, and even how players are handing some of their bigger lifts (squat, dead-lift). This will give a coach a decent measurement of where the team stands in terms of neuromuscular readiness. If these numbers start diving, workload needs to be adjusted.

Overall, teams that enter the season having been properly stressed to handle demands will be the strongest. Those that are given managed stress during the season to help maintain important athletic qualities are the ones who are most fresh in late February and March. They’ll likely be less injured and closer to their peak physical ability as tourney time begins.